Wilhelm Photography Blog

Moth Madness

I have been creating a collection of moth photos, and I am very excited to introduce to you several kinds of large moths in our area.  These tremendous moths, despite their size, are rarely seen due to their nocturnal behaviors. They are much more lovely than you would expect from the porch light sightings where we commonly get a glimpse.

My four moths all come from the order of Lepidoptera but will represent some different families within that large encompassing order. First, lets look at the Saturniidae family. Saturniids include the largest of the moths including giant silk moths like this Polyphemus Moth.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

This moth is easily identified by the eye spots on the wings. So much so that its name was given in reference to the Greek myth of Cyclops Polyphemus.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

It is easy to distinguish between males and females. The above image is of the female with less feathery antenna and below is a male with very pronounced and bushy antenna. They detect the pheromones of the female.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

Males will fly for miles in one night to find a female.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

My next moth is from the same order and family, but it is the only moth with this color pattern. This yellow beauty is the Imperial Moth.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

This is the only moth to be yellow with a tan/lavender or brown/pink pattern on it’s wings.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

The caterpillars of the imperial moths dig underground to form their cocoons so you will not find them hanging on vegetation in your yard.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

This one was missing an antenna when I found it.  I wondered if that would affect his quality of life. However, I found that these moths do not live long as adults. In fact, when they reach the adult phase, their mouth parts are so greatly reduced that they do not feed. They focus on reproduction and live only a week or more.

My next two moths are still in the Lepidoptera order, but come from the Sphingidae family which includes hawk moths, sphinx moths, and hornworms.

This is the Pandorous Sphinx Moth.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

These moths fly at dusk and have an incredible camouflage pattern.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

These adults drink nectar and are sometimes seen in meadows or along forest lines in the evening.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

When adults emerge from the cocoon, they pump their wings to disperse fluid and extend them.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

Although the caterpillars stage is destructive due to its ravenous nature. This guy has been known to devour even poison ivy which is a big plus to most folks.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

Also in this family is the Big Poplar Sphinx Moth.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

Another guy with one sad looking antenna. I had a hard time researching this one.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

 This was an unusual find. I had a hard time identifying this one.

Wilhelm Photography: Moth Madness

To identify this one, I have contacted an expert in this field, and he has already responded. My guess was close. When I identified this moth, I thought it was Genus: Pachysphinx and Species: Occidentals. This is more likely the Species: Modesta which would be found on the east coast. I am glad to have him correctly identified and excited to have my sighting logged and soon added to http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com!

For those of you who want the full classification to find out more…

Kingdom Animalia (Animals)

Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)

Class Insecta (Insects)

Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)

No Taxon (Moths)

Superfamily Bombycoidea

Family Sphingidae (Sphinx Moths)

Subfamily Smerinthinae

Tribe Smerinthini

Genus Pachysphinx

Species modesta (Modest Sphinx)

 

If you enjoy my Macro work or moths- let me know! 

L is for Ladybug. These are by far my most popular macro subjects. I hope today you enjoy them and learn a bit about them! This is a great one to share with curious kids.

This year, my kids and I found a ton of ladybug larvae while collecting aphids (it is amazing what you find when you search for a garden pests such as plant lice!) Many people do not know that ladybugs go through a complete metamorphosis from egg (which hatches in five days) to adult.  Let me show you what to look for next time you are in your garden.

Lady bug eggs. Tiny. This cluster is on one pine needle so you have to really be looking for them!

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This is a lady bug larva. Although larvae only grow to about one centimeter long, when they hatch they eat like crazy for three weeks. They don’t eat plants so don’t kick them out of your garden; ladybugs chow down on pests like aphids.

Lady Bug Larvae

After getting their fill, they enter into the pupa stage and attach themselves to a leaf or stem for about 5-7 before emerging as ladybug adults.

Becoming Lady

Becoming Lady

They will have their spots within twenty-four hours of emerging, and as they reach maturity their wings often darken from an orange to deep red.

Lady Bug and Bud

Lady and Umbrella

Ladybug and Umbrella

I was just discussing with a friend how this beetle is usually liked and considered cute unlike any other beetles or insects for that matter (with the exception of butterflies.) Funny how some polka dots and the name “lady” have changed our perspective.

Center Ring

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Lady on a Flame

Lady on a Flame

Lady on the Edge

Ladybugs are definitely a favorite for me to photograph!

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My daughter found this ladybug, “that is really different looking.” She is referring to the unique spots of an Eye-spotted Ladybug which are black with white rings around the spots.  The spots are designed to look like eyes which warn and scare the bugs that might be predators.  She was too pretty not to photograph so I thought I’d share my two favorite shots from the mini session with her.

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By a Thread

I also have a ladybug image in my Enchanted Forest Collection

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Last year I started a series called Enchanted Forest. Most of my macro photography is “true nature photography” where I photograph a creature in its element and hope that with a lot of patience the subject will finally decide to go where I was hoping it would. This series is a bit different in the fact that I create the stage for the critter.  All of the elements in my arranged backgrounds are real with the actual vibrant colors they appear to be. The background is usually out of focus leaves or flowers depending on the season.  The only photoshop involved in these images is stacking (which layers my depth of field for added areas of focus) and some of the rainbows- some of them are naturally occurring lens flare. This week, I added an image to my series.  Our praying mantises are just over a month old, and I knew I had to include one in the series since they have so much personality.

Enchanted Forest: Caterpillar

Enchanted Forest: Ladybugs

Enchanted Forest: Snail

Enchanted Forest: Young Praying Mantis

I’d love to know your thoughts…Do you like traditional nature images or the fantastic feel these have?  Which is your favorite from the series? Any suggestions for what kind of creature should be in my next shot in this series? Let me know in the comments.

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